Tuesday, 18 February 2014

Health

Are You Getting Enough Minerals?

Posted by Daily Health Mag on Tuesday, February 18, 2014
Minerals plays very important role in human body, here are the detail of important minerals ant its benefits:

Calcium

Why is it important? 
Essential for strong, healthy bones and teeth. A poor intake can lead to osteoporosis – a condition where the bones become weak and fracture easily.
Good food sources.
Milk, cheese and yogurt. Other sources include fish with edible bones (e.g. sardines), white bread, green leafy vegetables such as spinach, nuts, seeds, beans, dried fruit and oranges.

How much do you need?*
700mg a day for both men and women.
Ways to get enough each day:
Have 200ml semi-skimmed milk, 1 pot of low-fat fruit yogurt and a small chunk of low-fat Cheddar.
Watch out for:
Eat low-fat dairy products to lose weight. Research shows the calcium helps to shift fat, particularly around the midriff. When eaten in a diet rich in fruit and vegetables, they may also ease blood pressure.

Phosphorous

Why is it important?
Along with calcium, phosphorus is needed for strong bones and teeth. It produces energy in cells and creates phospholipids – important for healthy cell membranes.
Good food sources:
High-protein foods such as meat, fish, poultry, eggs and dairy products are rich in this mineral. Other sources include nuts, seeds and wholegrain breads and cereals.
How much do you need?*
550mg a day for both men and women.
Ways to get enough each day:
Have a grilled chicken breast and 2 slices of wholemeal bread. Or All-Bran with semi-skimmed milk and a 50g packet unsalted nuts.
Watch out for:
Calcium and phosphorus are like bricks and mortar – you need the right amount of each to build strong bones. Too much can inhibit the absorption of calcium, so only take supplements on medical advice.

Magnesium

Why is it important?
Needed for strong bones and teeth, energy, nerve function and muscle relaxation. Helps to regulate the rhythm of the heart and clot blood.
Good food sources:
Magnesium is found in a variety of foods, especially wholegrain cereals, wholemeal bread, green vegetables, nuts, seeds and seafood.
How much do you need?*
300mg a day for men; 270mg a day for women.
Ways to get enough each day:
Have a prawn, spinach and sesame seed stir-fry with brown rice for dinner.
Watch out for:
If you suffer from asthma, magnesium helps to relax the bronchial smooth muscle in the lungs, making breathing easier. A low intake of magnesium has also been linked with insomnia.

Sodium

Why is it important?
Works with potassium to regulate the balance of fluids. Also needed to activate enzymes and conduct nerve impulses. Too much is linked to high blood pressure.
Good food sources:
Sodium is found in many foods in the form of sodium chloride – more commonly known as salt. ‘Good food sources’ is a misnomer here.
How much do you need?*
1.6g a day for both men and women.
Ways to get enough each day.
Most people don’t have a problem getting enough sodium – in fact, the opposite is true.
Watch out for:
On average, most of us have more than 9g of salt a day but experts recommend limiting our intake to just 6g. Avoid adding salt to food – flavour food with herbs, spices, garlic, lemon juice, wine or pepper.

Potassium

Why is it important?
Works with sodium to control the balance of fluids. Also needed to conduct nerve impulses, initiate muscle contractions and regulate heartbeat and blood pressure.
Good food sources:
Found in many foods but the best sources are fruit and fruit juices, vegetables, milk, tea, coffee, meat, fish, nuts and seeds.
How much do you need?*
3.5g a day for both men and women.
Ways to get enough each day:
Eat a jacket potato with grilled cod and 2 grilled tomatoes. Or a grilled chicken breast with a salad of avocado, baby spinach and tomato.
Watch out for:
Eat more potassium-rich foods if you have high blood pressure or are at risk of it. Research shows that a good intake may help lower blood pressure, cutting the risk of heart disease and stroke.

Chloride

Why is it important?
Works with sodium and potassium to regulate fluid balance in the body, and important for the normal functioning of the muscles and nerves.
Good food sources:
Chloride is one of the main components of salt, technically known as sodium chloride. This means it’s found in all the same foods as those containing sodium (see above).
How much do you need?*
2.5g a day for both men and women.
Ways to get enough each day:
Table salt is 60% chloride so most people get more than enough.
Watch out for:
Chlorine is often added to water to purify it. If you think your water has a strong taste of chlorine, try boiling it. The chlorine will evaporate and the taste should improve.

Iron

Why is it important?
Needed for red blood cells and a vital component of haemoglobin – which transports oxygen to the cells – and many enzymes. Maintains the immune system.
Good food sources:
Richest sources are liver, kidney, lean red meat, and oily fish. Eggs, bread, green leafy vegetables such as spinach, pulses, dried fruit and fortified breakfast cereals also contain some.
How much do you need?*
8.7mg a day for men; 14.8mg a day for women.
Ways to get enough each day:
Eat 2 boiled eggs and wholemeal toast for breakfast and have lamb’s liver for dinner.
Watch out for:
Vitamin C helps the body absorb iron from food so eat foods rich in these two nutrients together, e.g. orange juice and breakfast cereal. In contrast, tannins in tea interfere with the absorption of iron.

Zinc

Why is it important?
Essential for growth, enzyme function, wound repair, and fertility. Keeps the immune system strong to fight infections such as coughs and colds.
Good food sources.
Red meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, cheese, nuts and seeds.
How much do you need?*
9.5mg a day for men; 7mg a day for women.
Ways to get enough each day.
Have a stew of lean braising steak. Or make a stir-fry using turkey thigh meat and cashew nuts.
Watch out for:
If your love life isn’t as hot as it used to be, try eating more zinc-rich foods. Diets containing poor amounts of this mineral have been linked to low libido and a loss of interest in sex.

Copper

Why is it important?
Trace mineral needed for the metabolism of fat and iron and a component of collagen, a protein in bones and skin. Good for immunity and a healthy heart.
Good food sources:
Offal, meat and shellfish. Bread, other cereal products, nuts, seeds and vegetables also contain some.
How much do you need?*
1.2mg a day for both men and women.
Ways to get enough each day.
Snack on 50g sunflower seeds. Or eat a crab sandwich for lunch.
Watch out for:
If your hair has gone grey almost overnight, eat more foods rich in copper. A poor intake can speed up the natural decline in melanin production that occurs with age, resulting in a loss of hair colour.

Selenium

Why is it important?
An antioxidant that protects against harmful free radicals. Also makes thyroid hormones that control metabolism and helps maintain the immune system.
Good food sources:
Meat, fish, poultry, nuts and seeds.
How much do you need?*
75mcg a day for men; 60mcg a day for women.
Ways to get enough each day:
Eat a jacket potato with a can of tuna in water. Or snack on 2 Brazil nuts.
Watch out for:
Make sure your diet contains plenty of vitamin E, found in vegetable oils, margarine, avocado, nuts, seeds, green leafy vegetables, eggs and wholegrains. It enhances the effectiveness of selenium.

Iodine

Why is it important?
An essential component of thyroxine, a hormone that’s made in the thyroid gland. Also controls metabolism, growth and development.
Good food sources:
Dairy products, eggs and seafood are good sources. Fruit, vegetables and cereals contain variable amounts depending on the iodine levels in soil.
How much do you need?*
140mcg a day for both men and women.
Ways to get enough each day:
Eat 1 grilled mackerel. Or have 2 boiled eggs and 1 small pot of low-fat natural yogurt.
Watch out for:
Encourage children and teenagers to eat plenty of iodine-rich foods. Research shows that people who have plenty of iodine in their diet have IQs 13 points higher, on average, than those who are deficient?
* mg = milligrams; mcg = micrograms; 1,000mcg = 1mg; 1,000mg = 1g: Daily recommendations are based on Department of Health guidelines for adults aged 19-50 years.

Kindly Bookmark and Share it:

0 comments:

Post a Comment

 
© 2014 Daily Health Mag All Rights Reserved by --> Health Tips | Love and Sex
Don't Forget To Join US Our Community
×
bloggerUpdate Daily Health Issues